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First Official Statement by Steven Salaita Concerning His Termination from UIUC

Posted on September 12, 2014 by Tadween Editors | 0 comments
My name is Steven Salaita. I am a professor with an accomplished scholarly record; I have been a fair and devoted teacher to hundreds of undergraduate and graduate students; I have been a valued and open-minded colleague to numerous faculty across disciplines and universities. My ideas and my identity are far more substantive and complex than the recent characterizations based on a selected handful of my Twitter posts.

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Today’s intellectuals: too obedient?

Posted on September 08, 2014 by Tadween Editors | 0 comments

By Fred Inglis

The Responsibility of Intellectuals, Noam Chomsky’s classic essay, is now approaching its 50th anniversary. His mighty polemic was written as his country, the US, moved deeper and deeper into national and international crisis. The tonnage of high explosive dropped on Vietnam finally exceeded the entire total of Allied bombs dropped on Europe during the Second World War. The American nation’s response to this horrifying display of brute power was a combustible mixture of more-or‑less approving indifference and, especially in the universities, passionate dissent, ardent opposition and, on the part of some thousands of young men awaiting conscription, the criminal, high-minded and public burning of draft cards.

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Scholars Pledge to Boycott UIUC Over the Firing of Steven Salaita

Posted on August 17, 2014 by Tadween Editors | 0 comments

On 6 August, Inside Higher Ed reported that the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) had rescinded a job offer to Steven G. Salaita, who was set to begin a tenured position in the American Indian Studies program this month. The article quoted “sources familiar with the university’s decision” as saying that the rescinding of Salaita’s job offer was due to the “tone” of comments that he had made on social media regarding Israel’s most recent attack on Gaza.

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Announcing Arab Studies Journal Vol. XXII: Relationship Between Cultural Production and Political Resistance

Posted on June 28, 2014 by Tadween Editors | 0 comments

In “Cultures of Resistance in Palestine and Beyond: The Politics of Art, Aesthetics, and Affect,” Sophie Richter-Devroe and Ruba Salih introduce the imperatives, questions, and ideas that inspired the special issue we are featuring here. Encompassing a broad array of approaches, methodologies, and perspectives, Rania Jawad, Adila Laïdi-Hanieh, Maha Nassar, Helga Tawil-Souri, Miriyam Aouragh, Craig Larkin, Brahim El Guabli, Hanan Toukan, and Yazid Anani each take on the relationship between cultural production and political resistance.

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The War Follows Them: Syrian University Students & Scholars in Lebanon

Posted on June 20, 2014 by Tadween Editors | 0 comments

This report marks the second phase of a broad-based research collaboration between the Institute of International Education (IIE) and the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) Human Rights Initiative. The aim is to understand what Syrians have lost, particularly in the fields of higher education and post-graduate training, and to determine how to improve their access to educational opportunities in the front-line states of Syria’s refugee crisis: Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey.

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New JADMAG: The Afterlives of the Algerian Revolution

Posted on June 10, 2014 by Tadween Editors | 0 comments


Edited by Muriam Haleh Davis

In July 2012, Algeria celebrated its 50th anniversary of independence, which signaled the victory of the FLN (National Liberation Front) over the French army. Despite five decades of Algerian independence, much of the work done on Algeria continues to focus on the colonial period. This pedagogical publication seeks to interrogate Algerian history since 1962 and considers how the revolution unleashed multiple socio-political dynamics that continue to mark contemporary Algeria.

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